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Blockchain Testing Tools

February 16, 2018 Leave a comment

If you are wondering what Blockchain is, I will give you a quick introduction. Blockchain is a data structure that is distributed at once in many different places and as you can’t ever delete from it, it is extremely difficult to make amendments. This makes the record more secure and more trustworthy.

So, what are the kinds of test that you can perform ? You can use the traditional testing, since it is just normal development work with normal testing criteria. So, boundary value analysis, decision tables, test driven development and behavior driven development techniques.

There is also a set of questions that can help you to build your test scenarios, for example:

  • How does it handles valid and invalid inputs?
  • How does it cope with a wide range of input data?
  • How does it handle missing state, or existing state?
  • How does it handle error cases?
  • How does it handle security and access control?

You don’t need to test the Blockchain because the algorithms are well-established, because it is a distributed system, but the transactions still require some kind of validation. For example, you may need to check if your transaction is valid before it can be approved. There are approval authorities for different blockchains, and they must test the integrity of the transactions.

 

What is Smart Contract ?

Smart Contract is an API and defines the rules for transactions in a Blockchain network. A Smart Contract is a set of rules in the form of programmable constructs that are capable of automatically enforcing themselves when pre-defined conditions are met.

It has public functions which might be called by anyone registered on the Blockchain network. However, unlike a traditional API, a Smart Contract cannot call external web APIs.

 

What do you need to know to test Ethereum Smart Contracts ?

Test automation requires that the platform being tested must have hooks so that external automated scripts can instruct the platform, observe the outcome, and verify that the outcome is what is expected. Legacy platforms in banking often do not have these hooks, and that makes automation much more difficult. When you compare smart contracts to older software used in banks, you can automate testing much earlier and much faster.

 

I will show some of the tools that you can use to perform tests on Blockchain applications:

 

Ethereum Tester

This github has a project for you to test Ethereum Blockchain Applications. You will need to clone Eth-Tester. The Eth-tester library strictly enforces some input formats and types.

 

Truffle

Truffle is one of the most popular Ethereum development frameworks and has testing functionality, it is a scaffolding framework for smart contracts used by UI builders. You have the ability to write automated tests for your contracts in both JavaScript and Solidity and get your contracts developed quickly.

Ganache

Ganache is the most-used library for testing Ethereum contracts locally. It mocks a blockchain that gives you access to accounts you can run tests, execute commands, etc.

 

Populus

By default tests run against an in-memory ethereum blockchain and as you can see here Populus supports writing contracts that are specifically for testing.

 

Manticore

Manticore is a symbolic execution tool for analysis of binaries and smart contracts. It is supported on Linux and requires Python 2.7. Ubuntu 16.04 is strongly recommended. It has a Python programming interface which can be used to implement custom analyses. You can see more about here on the wiki.

 

Hyperledger Composer

Hyperledger Composer supports three types of testing: interactive testing, automated unit testing and automated system testing. It’s a framework for rapidly building Blockchain business networks on top of a Blockchain platform, such as Hyperledger Fabric.

This framework allows you to automatically deploy the business network definition, and then interact with it by submitting queries and transactions in order to test how that business network really behaves.

 

Corda Testing Tools

Corda is a blockchain-inspired, open-source distributed ledger platform. There are several distinct test suites each with a different purpose: Unit tests, Integration tests, Smoke tests, Load tests and other. These tests are mostly written with JUnit and can run via Gradle.

 

BitcoinJ

This tool BitcoinJ allows you to interact with Bitcoin connecting directly to the bitcoin network. So, you can simulate send and receive transactions in real time, also you don’t need to have a local copy of the Bitcoin Core.

You can follow this guide to get start with this tool.

 

Resources:

https://www.joecolantonio.com/2018/02/01/blockchain-testing-tools/

https://joecolantonio.com/testtalks/175-blockchain-application-testing-rhian-lewis/

http://searchsoftwarequality.techtarget.com/answer/Heres-everything-you-need-to-know-about-testing-blockchain

https://www.capgemini.com/2017/01/testing-of-smart-contracts-in-the-blockchain-world/

http://www.bcs.org/content/conWebDoc/56020

https://medium.com/@mrsimonstone/test-your-blockchain-business-network-using-hyperledger-composer-c8e8f112da08

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WebDriverIO framework first steps

November 26, 2017 1 comment

Hey guys, I have been studying a framework called WebdriverIO, it is a really good framework for Angular applications. It is compatible with BDD and TDD, so you can create your featuresimplement the step definition and it is also a synchronous command handling !!

Not only the hooks, but many useful parts are already in the config file, so you don’t need to create them separately, which is  always very handful.

I have pushed the project to github so you can have a look on my example, it is very simple for now.

https://github.com/rafaelaazevedo/webdriverio-study

 

– To run the project you need to run npm install and after ./node_modules/.bin/wdio wdio.conf.js

 

– In the login-spec.js you can add the scenario (describe) and the steps (it) directly like the step definitions, I don’t have the feature files for now.

– Look how you don’t need to add return for each step anymore. Since the steps are sync you don’t need to worry about it.

– The login-page.js groups all the common functions that will be used on the login scenarios.

– And the login-elements.js contains all the element getters that are on the login page, it works like a library for the elements and it will help you with the maintenance of the code.

If you want to give it a try as well you can add the webdriverio in the package of your project and follow these steps

Run Postman scripts on Jenkins with Docker

November 6, 2017 Leave a comment

You can run Postman scripts from the command line with Newman, but if you want to run these scripts as part of your Continuous Integration environment, you can run it with Docker or directly on Jenkins.  In case you prefer to use Docker, you can get started by downloading the Jenkins Docker instance and changing the Dockerfile to include node using the following node installation code found in the Docker/Jenkins Repository:

# Install Node

RUN curl -sL https://deb.nodesource.com/setup_4.x | bash

RUN apt-get -y install nodejs

RUN node -v

RUN npm -v

RUN npm install -g newman

Then, you will need to rebuild the Docker image and start the container with the same instructions as in the Jenkins Docker Repository.

You should now have a fully working Jenkins instance installed locally. Great! Now back to the task at hand using the newly-installed instance of Jenkins:

  • Create a new “Freestyle” job in Jenkins.

You will set it up to be able to upload the collection as a parameter. When you do this with your own projects, you should commit the Postman collection into whatever repository you’re using and pull directly from that repository to build by selecting “this project is parametrized” and then choosing “Add Parameter” with a “File Parameter.”

 

  • Select two file uploads – one for the collection and one for the environment.

  • Add a post-build step with “Execute Shell”. You’ll use the same command you used to run it from your own command line earlier (If you are using the same OS) except your path should be collection.js, as you named it ‘newman run collection.json’ in the File Parameter name field.

 

  • Now test it and run the build. I just uploaded the collection.json since I’m not using the environment file yet, but you can add it to the command line with:
    newman run collection.json –e environment.json

 

If you want to use the built in JUnit Jenkins viewer, you can archive the XML test result and point the tests to it. Below there is a sample of how you might archive and use the JUnit test results.

 

 

Resources: https://www.qasymphony.com/blog/automated-api-testing-tutorial/

API tests with newman and postman

October 21, 2017 Leave a comment

 

API is the most important part of your software because it has the highest security risks. What if someone were to hack your API? They could get production data, they could Bitcoin ransom the servers or they could hide on the machine until something interesting happens. The bottom line is, the stakes when using an API are much higher than if there is just a bug in the UI of your application — your data could be at risk and, by proxy, all of your users’ data.

API testing is not only the most vital testing to be done against your application, but it is also the easiest and quickest to execute

With your API tests and having a Continuous integration process, you can:

  • Test all of your endpoints no matter where they are hosted
  • Quickly ensure all of your services are running as expected
  • Confirm that all of your endpoints are secured from unauthorized AND unauthenticated users

 

Postman

Download postman for free

Now you need to have an API to test, you can select one from any-api or qa-symphony for this tutorial. In this example we are going to use this Oxford Dictionaries. Now on postman, you can create a collection and start to feed with your tests. Also, you can create an environment with environment variables and also global variables that can be used across the requests, for example a token.

 

Login with Token on Postman

  • Click on Manage Environments

 

  • Set the host

  • Type the request URL, change the host to the variable {{host}}
  • Select POST request and type the headers

 

  • Type the Body with the credentials for your site.

 

  • Open the Tests tab and write the tests to validate the request and set the access_token as an environment variable. You will need to use this variable in the header of all of your next requests.

var jsonData = JSON.parse(responseBody);

tests["Status code is 200"] = responseCode.code === 200;
tests["Access Token is not blank"] = jsonData.access_token !== "";
tests["Message success"] = jsonData.scope.indexOf("success") !== -1;

postman.setEnvironmentVariable ("access_token", jsonData.access_token);

 

  • Hit Send and if the status code is 200, it means the credentials are correct. Save the request in your collection.

 

  • Now you can create all the other requests and tests needed, just remember to add the {{access_token}} in your header and save the requests in your collection

 

 

Running your API automated tests

  • Now that you have a collection with all your tests, click on Runner and select your collection, environment. Type the number of interactions and delays in case you want to simulate more than multiple interactions.

  • You can also import a CSV file with data and substitute for variables in the body or header of the request.

 

  • The results report will be like this one:

 

Newman

 

To run your tests from the command line you need to have Newman, open your terminal and run npm install -g newman

  • Export your collection from Postman (Collection_v2) and download your environment (go to “Manage Environments” and click the download button) from Postman

 

  • Open your terminal an type the command to run the API tests: newman run /local/path_to_your_postman_collection.json

 

  • The result will be something like this:

 

  • To run the script on Jenkins you need to add the parameters  –reporters junit,json and the results should be created under a folder called “Newman” in your working directory, so: newman run -reporters junit,json /local/path_to_your_postman_collection.json

 

Resources: https://www.qasymphony.com/blog/automated-api-testing-tutorial/

https://api.qasymphony.com/#/login/postAccessToken

Usability Testing

October 12, 2017 Leave a comment

Hello guys,

Today I am going to write about some usability tests techniques that you can use in your day-to-day tests. Usability tests is where you can figure out if your design is working or not, what can be improved and what is not straight forward.

Jakob Nielsen created the 10 usability heuristics, which includes:

  • Visibility of system status
  • Match between system and the real world
  • User control and freedom
  • Consistency and standards
  • Error prevention
  • Recognition rather than recall
  • Flexibility and efficiency of use
  • Aesthetic and minimalist design
  • Help users recognize, diagnose, and recover from errors
  • Help and documentation

 

Know your user

When you know your users, you can focus on their goals, the characteristics that they have and the attitudes that they display. You should also examine what the user expects from the product.

User personas are created from other forms of user research and thus offer an real life portrait that is easy for the team to keep in mind when designing the products. User personas have a name and a story.

 

Simplify

We need to start with the idea of a user in your worst case scenario when doing UX testing, someone who knows nothing about your product, is distracted when they use the system, has bad cell reception, etc. By watching that person use and fumble through your product, you can quickly identify areas where the app is not simple, clear or fast enough.

 

Trust your intuition

It’s important to remember what specific problem you’re setting out to solve. Trust your guts: early on, it’s especially important when larger decisions are so fragile. Remember that you can’t build something that pleases everyone: trying to do so normally results in a weak release. Stay focused on the use-case you want to nail and avoid trying to solve all the use cases at once. The smallest details can be the difference between a product that has a good experience for the user and one that has not.

 

Efficiency

It lies in the time taken by the user to do a task. For instance, if you are an E-commerce site, the efficiency of your site depends on the time and the number of steps that the users take to complete the basic tasks like buying a product.

 

Recall

This is one of the most important aspects to examine the person’s memory concerning the browsing process and the interface they used a while ago. If your design is simple and straight forward it will be easier to remember how to complete a task.

 

Emotional response

This helps to analyze the user’s feelings after they have used the product. Some might feel happy while others might feel down and there are others who are so deeply impressed that they recommend the product to their friend.

 

Resources:

https://uxmastery.com/beginners-guide-to-usability-testing/

https://www.nngroup.com/articles/how-many-test-users/

https://thenextweb.com/dd/2013/08/10/13-ways-to-master-ux-testing-for-your-startup/#.tnw_3ngxAqEM

https://www.invisionapp.com/blog/ux-usability-research-testing/

https://www.interaction-design.org/literature/article/7-great-tried-and-tested-ux-research-techniques

https://uxdesign.cc/ux-tools-for-user-research-and-user-testing-a720131552e1

https://www.cso.com.au/article/626752/data-breach-notification-just-it-business/

Hiring QAs, Headless vs Real Browsers, Automated tests, Consumer contracting tests

September 30, 2017 Leave a comment

Hi guys, I went to the #18 Agile Roundabout meetup here in London and I found really interesting to share. The first video is a talk about some of the challenges that we have when hiring QAs and about automation on headless browsers vs real browsers. The second is about some of the challenges that we have when implementing automated tests in a company and the third one is about how to do consumer contracting tests with Pact.

I do recommend everyone to watch the videos since it was really interesting to hear these experiences and you might be facing one of these situations.

Common mistakes when you hire QAs

 

Automated Tests

 

Consumer Contract Testing

 

 

Thank you guys for this great meetup !

Selling automation to non-technical people

September 19, 2017 Leave a comment
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